Ивайло Иванов по пътя към световните върхове на джудото !

TEL AVIV GRAND PRIX 2019

MUKI Sagi ISR – IVANOV Ivaylo BUL
Final -81
I W P I W P
1 0 – – 0

PARLATI Christian ITA – IVANOV Ivaylo BUL

Semi-Final -81
I W P I W P
– 0 – 1 0

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – BRIAND Etienne CAN
Quarter-Final -81
I W P I W P
1 0 – – 0

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – URQUIZA SOLANA Alfonso ESP
Round 3 -81
I W P I W P
– 1 – 0

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – CERCEA Marcel ROU
Round 2 -81
I W P I W P
1 1 – – 0

 

Tel Aviv Grand Prix 2019
ILIEVA Ivelina BUL – KARAKAS Hedvig HUN
Bronze -57
I W P I W P
– 1 – 0

Tel Aviv Grand Prix 2019
ILIEVA Ivelina BUL- CYSIQUE Sarah Leonie FRA
Repechage -57
I W P I W P
– 1 – 0

Tel Aviv Grand Prix 2019
NELSON LEVY Timna ISR – ILIEVA Ivelina BUL
Quarter-Final -57
I W P I W P
1 0 – 0

Tel Aviv Grand Prix 2019
ILIEVA Ivelina BUL – LO GIUDICE Martina ITA
Round 2 -57
I W P I W P
– 1 – 0

Tel Aviv Grand Prix 2019
ILIEVA Ivelina BUL – NURJAVOVA Rushana TKM
Round 1 -57
I W P I W P
1 1 – – 0

 

 

Judo Grand-Prix The Hague 2018

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – DE WIT Frank NED

Final -81
I W P I W P
1 0 – – 1

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – HEIJMAN Jim NED
Semi-Final -81
I W P I W P
1 0 – – 0

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – VISAN Vlad ROU
Quarter-Final -81
I W P I W P
1 1 – 0

IVANOV Ivaylo BUL – BUSCH Victor SWE
Round 3 -81
I W P I W P
1 0 – 1

MOLLAEI Saeid IRI – IVANOV Ivaylo BUL
Round 2 -81
I W P I W P
– 0 1 0

ZABOROSCIUC Nicon MDA – IVANOV Ivaylo BUL
Round 1 -81
I W P I W P
– 0 – 1

 

Special Judo Fitness Test

VO2 max

VOmax

Fitness can be measured by the volume of oxygen you can consume while exercising at your maximum capacity. VO2 max is the maximum amount of oxygen in millilitres, one can use in one minute per kilogram of body weight. Those who are fit have higher VO2max values and can exercise more intensely than those who are not as well conditioned. Numerous studies show that you can increase your VO2 max by working out at an intensity that raises your heart rate to between 65 and 85% of its maximum for at least 20 minutes three to five times a week (referenced in French & Long (2012)[8]). A mean value of VO2 max for male athletes is about 3.5 litres/minute and for female athletes it is about 2.7 litres/minute.

Factors affecting VOmax

The physical limitations that restrict the rate at which energy can be released aerobically are dependent upon:

  • the chemical ability of the muscular cellular tissue system to use oxygen in breaking down fuels
  • the combined ability of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems to transport the oxygen to the muscular tissue system

There are various physiological factors that combine to determine VOmax for which there are two theories: Utilization Theory and Presentation Theory.

Utilization theory maintains that VOmax is determined by the body’s ability to utilize the available oxygen whereas Presentation Theory maintains it is the ability of the body’s cardiovascular system to deliver oxygen to active tissues.

A study by Saltin and Rowell (1980)[3] concluded that it is the delivery of oxygen to active tissues that is the major limiting factor to VO2 max. A study by Gollnick et al. (1972)[4] showed a weak relationship between the body’s ability to utilize the available oxygen and VO2 max.

VOmax for various groups

The tables below, adapted from Wilmore and Costill (2005)[2], detail normative data for VOmax (ml/kg/min) in various population groups.

Non Athletes

Age Male Female
10-19 47-56 38-46
20-29 43-52 33-42
30-39 39-48 30-38
40-49 36-44 26-35
50-59 34-41 24-33
60-69 31-38 22-30
70-79 28-35 20-27

Athletes

Sport Age Male Female
Baseball 18-32 48-56 52-57
Basketball 18-30 40-60 43-60
Cycling 18-26 62-74 47-57
Canoeing 22-28 55-67 48-52
Football (USA) 20-36 42-60
Gymnastics 18-22 52-58 35-50
Ice Hockey 10-30 50-63
Orienteering 20-60 47-53 46-60
Rowing 20-35 60-72 58-65
Skiing alpine 18-30 57-68 50-55
Skiing nordic 20-28 65-94 60-75
Soccer 22-28 54-64 50-60
Speed skating 18-24 56-73 44-55
Swimming 10-25 50-70 40-60
Track & Field – Discus 22-30 42-55
Track & Field – Running 18-39 60-85 50-75
Track & Field – Running 40-75 40-60 35-60
Track & Field – Shot 22-30 40-46
Volleyball 18-22 40-56
Weight Lifting 20-30 38-52
Wrestling 20-30 52-65

Athlete’s VO2 max Scores

The following are the VOmax scores for a selection of the top female and male athletes.

VO2 max (ml/kg/min) Athlete Gender Sport/Event
96.0 Espen Harald Bjerke Male Cross Country Skiing
96.0 Bjorn Daehlie Male Cross Country Skiing
92.5 Greg LeMond Male Cycling
92.0 Matt Carpenter Male Marathon Runner
92.0 Tore Ruud Hofstad Male Cross Country Skiing
91.0 Harri Kirvesniem Male Cross Country Skiing
88.0 Miguel Indurain Male Cycling
87.4 Marius Bakken Male 5K Runner
85.0 Dave Bedford Male 10K Runner
85.0 John Ngugi Male Cross Country Runner
73.5 Greta Waitz Female Marathon runner
71.2 Ingrid Kristiansen Female Marathon Runner
67.2 Rosa Mota Female Marathon Runner

VO2 max and age

As we get older our VO2 max decreases. A study by Jackson et al. (1995)[5] found the average decrease was 0.46 ml/kg/min per year for men (1.2%) and 0.54 ml/kg/min for women (1.7%). The decline is due to a number of factors including a reduction in maximum heart rate and maximum stoke volume.

VO2 max and performance

VOmax on its own is a poor predictor of performance but using the velocity (vVO2 max) and duration (tlimvVO2 max) that an athlete can operate at their VO2 max will provide a better indication of performance.

VOmax evaluation tests

An estimate of your VOmax can be determined using any of the following tests:

VOmax – using HRmax and HRrest

Research by Uth et al. (2004)[9] found that VOmax can be estimated indirectly from an individuals maximum heart rate (HRmax)and resting heart rate (HRrest) with an accuracy that compares favourably with other common VOmax tests. It is given by:

  • VOmax = 15 x (HRmax ÷ HRrest)

The following calculator will do the calculation for you. Enter your HRmax and HRrest and then select the “Calculate” button.

HRmax  bpm HRrest  bpm 2max  ml/kg/min

VO2max – using Age, Body Mass and HRrest

Rexhepi et al. (2014)[10] research with 1500 active football players aged 16 to 35 produced the following equation based on the results from their Astrand Bike Test using their age, body mass and resting heart rate.

  • VOmax = 3.542+ (-0.014 x Age) + (0.015 x Body Mass [kg]) + (-0.011 x Resting Heart Rate)

The following calculator will do the calculation for you. Enter your Age, Body Mass (kg) and HRrest and then select the “Calculate” button.

Age  yrs Body Mass  kg HRrest  bpm VO2max  L/min  ml/kg/min

Improving your VO2 max

The following are samples of Astrands (a work physiologists) workouts for improving oxygen uptake:

  • (1) – Run at maximum speed for 5 minutes. Note the distance covered in that time. Let us assume that the distance achieved is 1900 metres. Rest for 5 minutes, and then run the distance (1900 metres) 20% slower, in other words in 6 minutes, with 30 seconds rest, repeated many times. This is equal to your 10 Km pace
  • (2) – Run at maximum speed for 4 minutes. Note the distance covered in that time. Rest for 4 minutes. In this case, we will assume you run a distance of 1500 metres. Now run the same distance 15% slower, in other words in 4 minutes 36 seconds, with 45 seconds rest, repeated several times. This approximates to a time between the athlete’s 5 Km and 10 Km time
  • (3) – Run at maximum effort for 3 minute. Note the distance covered in that time. The distance covered is, say 1000 metres. Successive runs at that distance are taken 10% slower or at 3 minutes 18 seconds, with 60 seconds rest, repeated several times. This approximates to your 5 Km time
  • (4) – Run at maximum effort for 5 minutes. Note the distance covered in that time. The distance covered is 1900 metres. Rest 5 minutes. The distance is now covered 5% slower with 1½ minutes rest. This is approximately 3K pace for you, i.e. 5 minutes 15 seconds/1900 metres
  • (5) – Run at maximum effort for 3 minutes. The distance covered is 1100 metres. When recovered, the athlete then runs the same distance 5% slower, i.e. 3 minutes 9 seconds/1100 metres, with a minute rest, repeated several times. This is at 3 Km pace

When and how often

It is suggested that in the winter sessions (1) and (2) are done weekly, and in the track season sessions (3), (4) and (5) are done weekly by runners from 800 metres to the half-marathon. Although it would be convenient to use the original distance marks made by the duration efforts, this does not take into account the athlete’s condition before each session, so the maximum effort runs must be done on each occasion when they may be either more or less than the previous distance run. The maximum duration efforts are in themselves quality sessions. If the pulse rate has not recovered to 120 beats per minute in the rest times given, the recovery period should be extended before the repetitions are started. The recovery times between the repetitions should be strictly adhered to. These workouts make a refreshing change from repetition running. When all five sessions are completed within a month, experience shows substantial improvements in performance.

The effect of altitude

VOmax decreases as altitude increases above 1600m and for every 1000m above 1600m maximal oxygen uptake decreases by approximately 8-11%. The decrease is mainly due to a decrease in maximal cardiac output (product of heart rate and stroke volume). Stoke volume decreases due to the immediate decrease in blood plasma volume.

VO2max Assessment

The VO2 max assessment is based on the Cooper VO2 max tables for both the 1997[6] and 2005[7] tables.

For an evaluation of your VOmax select the age group and gender, enter your VOmax and then select the ‘Calculate’ button.

Age
13-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
Gender
Female
Male
VO2max  ml/kg/min
Assessment – ‘v’ 1997 Tables
Assessment – ‘v’ 2005 Tables

Normative data for VO2 max in 1997

Normative data (Heywood 1998)[6] for Female (values in ml/kg/min)

Age Very Poor Poor Fair Good Excellent Superior
13-19 <25 25 – 30 31 – 34 35 – 38 39 – 41 >41
20-29 <24 24 – 28 29 – 32 33 – 36 37 – 41 >41
30-39 <23 23 – 27 28 – 31 32 – 36 37 – 40 >40
40-49 <21 21 – 24 25 – 28 29 – 32 33 – 36 >36
50-59 <20 20 – 22 23 – 26 27 – 31 32 – 35 >35
60+ <17 17 – 19 20 – 24 25 – 29 30 – 31 >31

Normative data (Heywood 1998)[6] for Male (values in ml/kg/min)

Age Very Poor Poor Fair Good Excellent Superior
13-19 <35 35 – 37 38 – 44 45 – 50 51 – 55 >55
20-29 <33 33 – 35 36 – 41 42 – 45 46 – 52 >52
30-39 <31 31 – 34 35 – 40 41 – 44 45 – 49 >49
40-49 <30 30 – 32 33 – 38 39 – 42 43 – 47 >48
50-59 <26 26 – 30 31 – 35 36 – 40 41 – 45 >45
60+ <20 20 – 25 26 – 31 32 – 35 36 – 44 >44

Normative data for VOmax in 2005

Normative data (Heywood 2006)[7] for Female (values in ml/kg/min)

Age Poor Fair Good Excellent Superior
20 – 29 <36 36 – 39 40 – 43 44 – 49 >49
30 – 39 <34 34 – 36 37 – 40 41 – 45 >45
40 – 49 <32 32 – 34 35 – 38 39 – 44 >44
50 – 59 <25 25 – 28 29 – 30 31 – 34 >34
60 – 69 <26 26 – 28 29 – 31 32 – 35 >35
70 – 79 <24 24 – 26 27 – 29 30 – 35 >35

Normative data (Heywood 2006)[7] for Male (values in ml/kg/min)

Age Poor Fair Good Excellent Superior
20 – 29 <42 42 – 45 46 – 50 51 – 55 >55
30 – 39 <41 41 – 43 44 – 47 48 – 53 >53
40 – 49 <38 38 – 41 42 – 45 46 – 52 >52
50 – 59 <35 35 – 37 38 – 42 43 – 49 >49
60 – 69 <31 31 – 34 35 – 38 39 – 45 >45
70 – 79 <28 28 – 30 31 – 35 36 – 41 >41

% HRmax and %VOmax

It is possible to estimate your exercise intensity as a percentage of VO2 max from your training heart rate. A study by David Swain et al. (1994)[1] using statistical procedures examined the relationship between %HRmax and %VO2 max. Their results led to the following regression equation:

  • %HRmax = 0.64 × %VO2 max + 37

The relationship has been shown to hold true across sex, age and activity.

Calculator

The following calculator will do the conversion for you. Enter a value, select the parameter (HRmax or VO2 max) and then select the “Calculate” button.

Value =  %
MHR
VO2max
=  %

%VO2 max and Speed

% of VO2 max Speed
50 Very slow running
60 Slow running
70 Steady running
80 Half Marathon speed
90 10 km speed
95 5 km speed
100 3 km speed
110 1500 metres to 800 metres speed

Free Calculator

  • %VOmax to %HRmax Calculator – a free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet which you can download and use on your computer. The spreadsheet will be loaded into a new window.

 

 

 


References

  1. SWAIN et al. (1994) Target HR for the development of CV fitness. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 26 (1), p. 112-116
  2. WILMORE, J.H. and COSTILL, D.L. (2005) Physiology of Sport and Exercise. 3rd ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics
  3. SALTIN, B. and ROWELL, L.B. (1980) Functional adaptations to physical activity and inactivity. Federation Proceeding. 39 (5), p. 1506-1513
  4. GOLLNICK, P.D. et al. (1972) Enzyme activity and fiber composition in skeletal muscle of untrained and trained men. J Appl Physiol., 33 (3), p. 312-319
  5. JACKSON, A.S. et al. (1995) Changes in aerobic power of men, ages 25-70 yr. Med Sci Sports Exerc., 27 (1), p. 113-120
  6. HEYWOOD, V. (1998) The Physical Fitness Specialist Certification Manual, The Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research, Dallas TX, revised 1997. In: HEYWOOD, V (1998) Advance Fitness Assessment & Exercise Prescription, 3rd Ed. Leeds: Human Kinetics. p. 48
  7. HEYWOOD, V. (2006) The Physical Fitness Specialist Manual, The Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research, Dallas TX, revised 2005. In: HEYWOOD, V (2006) Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription, Fifth Edition, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  8. FRENCH, J. and LONG, M. (2012) How to improve your VO2max. Athletics Weekly, November 8 2012, p.53
  9. UTH, N. et al. (2004) Estimation of VO2 max from the ratio between HRmax and HRrest – the Heart Rate Ratio Method”. Eur J Appl Physiol. 91(1), p.111-115
  10. REXHEPI, A. M. et al. (2014) Prediction of vo2max based on age, body mass, and resting heart rate. Human Movement. 15 (1), p. 56-59.

Related References

The following references provide additional information on this topic:

  • BELTRAN, L. et al. (2014) Prediction of VO2max Using Serial 400-m Running Times in Male Collegiate Soccer Players. Journal of Kinesiology and Nutrition Student Research2
  • HAUGEN, T. A. et al. (2014) VO2max Characteristics of Elite Female Soccer Players, 1989-2007.International journal of sports physiology and performance, 9 (3), p. 515-521
  • Matsuo, T. et al. (2014) Effects of a low-volume aerobic-type interval exercise on VO2max and cardiac mass. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 46 (1), p. 42-50

Page Reference

If you quote information from this page in your work, then the reference for this page is:

Related Pages

The following Sports Coach pages provide additional information on this topic:

 

Additional Sources of Information

For further information on this topic see the following:

  • BEASHEL, P. and TAYLOR, J. (1996) Advanced Studies in Physical Education and Sport. UK: Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd.
  • BEASHEL, P. and TAYLOR, J. (1997) The World of Sport Examined. UK: Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd.
  • BIZLEY, K. (1994) Examining Physical Education. Oxford; Heinemann Educational Publishers
  • DAVIS, B. et al. (2000) Physical Education and the Study of Sport. UK London: Harcourt Publishers Ltd.
  • GALLIGAN, F. et al. (2000) Advanced PE for Edexcel. Oxford; Heinemann Educational Publishers
  • McARDLE, W. et al. (2000) Essentials of Exercise Physiology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Advertising

In order to provide the free information on this website we advertise products and services in order to help cover the costs of maintaining the information and hosting the website with our internet service provider. Please support us by disabling your ad blocker on our website. Thank You.

 

Share this Article

Share this Article with your friends on social media.

Twitter      Facebook      Google      LinkedIn      VK     Pinterest

 

Sports Coach Updates

Updates to the Web Site are detailed on the Sports Coach Blog

 

Need more help?

If you are unable to find the information you are looking for then please select this link to email me your query or email me at brian@brianmac.co.uk

 

Tell me what you think of the Sports Coach Website

Heart Rate Zones

Heart Rate Zones Heart

Heart rate training zones are calculated by taking into consideration your Maximum Heart Rate (HRmax) and your Resting Heart Rate(HRrest). Within each training zone, subtle physiological effects take place to enhance your fitness.

The Energy Efficient or Recovery Zone – 60% to 70%

Training within this zone develops basic endurance and aerobic capacity. All easy recovery running should be completed at a maximum of 70%. Another advantage to running in this zone is that while you are happily fat burning you may lose weight and you will be allowing your muscles to re-energise with glycogen, which has been expended during those faster paced workouts.

 

 

The Aerobic Zone – 70% to 80%

Training in this zone will develop your cardiovascular system. The body’s ability to transport oxygen to, and carbon dioxide away from, the working muscles can be developed and improved. As you become fitter and stronger from training in this zone it will be possible to run some of your long weekend runs at up to 75%, so getting the benefits of some fat burning and improved aerobic capacity.

The Anaerobic Zone – 80% to 90%

Training in this zone will develop your lactic acid system. In this zone, your individual anaerobic threshold (AT) is found – sometimes referred to the point of deflection (POD). During these heart rates, the amount of fat being utilised as the main source of energy is greatly reduced and glycogen stored in the muscle is predominantly used. One of the by-products of burning this glycogen is lactic acid. There is a point at which the body can no longer remove the lactic acid from the working muscles quickly enough. This is your anaerobic threshold (AT). Through the correct training, it is possible to delay the AT by being able to increase your ability to deal with the lactic acid for a longer period of time or by pushing the AT higher.

The Red Line Zone 90% to 100%

Training in this zone will only be possible for short periods. It effectively trains your fast twitch muscle fibres and helps to develop speed. This zone is reserved for interval running and only the very fit are able to train effectively within this zone.

Heart rate variations for a given intensity

A reduction in heart rate for a given intensity is usually due to an improvement in fitness but a number of other factors might explain why heart rates can vary for a given intensity:

  • Dehydration can increase the heart rate by up to 7.5%
  • Heat and humidity can increase the heart rate by 10 beats/minute
  • Altitude can increase the heart rate by 10 to 20%, even when acclimatised
  • Biological variation can mean the heart rate varies from day to day by 2 to 4 beats/minute

Resting Heart Rate

To determine your resting heart rate (HRrest) is very easy. Find somewhere nice and quiet, lie down and relax. Position a watch or clock where you can clearly see it whilst lying down. After 20 minutes determine your resting pulse rate (beats/min). Use this value as your (HRrest).

If you have a heart rate monitor, then put it on before you lie down. After the 20 minutes check the recordings and identify the lowest value achieved. Use this value as your HRrest.

The heart is a muscle so with regular exercise it will become larger and become more efficient as a pump. As a result, you will find your resting heart rate gets lower so you will need to check your HRrest on a regular basis (e.g. Monthly).

Calculation of a zone value

The calculation of a zone value, X%, is performed in the following way:

  • Subtract your HRrestfrom your HRmax giving us your reserve heart rate (HRreserve)
  • Calculate the required X% on the HRreserve giving us “Z”
  • Add “Z” and your HRrest together to give us the final value

Example: The athlete’s HRmax is 180 and their HRrest is 60 – determine the 70% value

  • HRmax – HRrest = 180 – 60 = 120
  • 70% of 120 = 84
  • 84 + HRrest = 84 + 60 = 144 bpm

 

 

Training Zone Heart Rate Calculator

Please remember that any equation used to determine your maximum heart rate (HRmax) is only a best guess and not a guarantee of your true HRmax value. The use of an equation implies that everyone of the same age has the same HRmax, which is not the case. To determine your true HRmax you should consider conducting a Stress Test.

The calculator determines your HRmax based on the equation: 217 – (age × 0.85) (Miller et al. 1993)[1]

If you know your true HRmax then adjust your “Age” so that the correct value appears in the “Max Heart Rate” window.

Enter your age, resting heart rate, the lower and upper training zone values (%) and then select the ‘Calculate’ button.

Age years Max Heart Rate bpm
Resting Heart Rate bpm Reserve Heart Rate bpm
Lower Training Zone % which is a Heart Rate of bpm
Upper Training Zone % which is a Heart Rate of bpm
Estimated VOmax  ml/kg/min

VOmax – using heart rates

Research by Uth et al. (2004)[2] found that VOmax can be estimated indirectly from an individual’s maximum heart rate (HRmax) and resting heart rate (HRrest) with an accuracy that compares favourably with other common VOmax tests. It is given by:

  • VOmax = 15 x (HRmax ÷ HRrest)

Free Calculator

  • Training Zone Heart Rate Calculator – a free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that you can download and use on your computer. The spreadsheet will be loaded into a new window.

Taipei Asian Open 2018

Бронзов медал за Даниел Дичев от Азия джудо оупън за мъже и жени- 7 и 8 юли, 2018

European Judo Cup Celje 2018

European Judo Cup Celje 2018
-63 kg
1. DOI, Masako (JPN)
2. BENJAMINS, Michelle (NED)
3. BAZYNSKI, Nadja (GER) 
3. ILIEVA, Ivelina (BUL)
5. CACCHIONE, Chiara (ITA)
5. LUDVIK, Lia (SLO)
7. HREBENOZHKO, Yuliia (UKR)
7. POHL, Dena (GER)

13. to 16. September 2018 JUNIOR EUROPEAN JUDO CHAMPIONSHIPS – INDIVIDUAL & TEAM SOFIA, BULGARIA

European Judo Championships 2018

European Judo Championships 2018
-60 kg
1. YASHUEV, Islam (RUS)
2. GERCHEV, Yanislav (BUL)
3. MCKENZIE, Ashley (GBR) 
3. MUDRANOV, Beslan (RUS)
5. LESYUK, Artem (UKR)
5. PAPINASHVILI, Amiran (GEO)
7. GARRIGOS, Francisco (ESP)
7. SZABO, Csaba (HUN)